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Forum Impact

The Forum impacts the activists who attend in many different ways. Here are just a few examples.

Migrant women
Migrant women
INGO
INGO
Caribbean women
Caribbean women
UN Women
UN Women
Government
Government
 
The Women and Global Migration International Working Group is organizing migrant women workers and their allies to influence the UN High Level Dialogue on Migration & Development, in October 2013 in NYC.

The Oxfam Female Food Heroes at AWID Forum 2012.
Photo courtesy of: Oxfam

Oxfam International participants at the Forum produced an internal reflections document that will orientate their position and strategy on women’s economic rights.

“On the topic of women’s rights and economy, there were several discussions around microfinance and its strengths and weaknesses as a tool for women’s empowerment…The resulting proposition is that INGOs and the like must focus on women’s economic rights, rather than economic rescue… The conversations around women’s rights and the economy raised interesting questions for Oxfam.

Namely, how can we guarantee a humanized economic development model that does not marginalize women? As a well-respected leader in debates and proposals on poverty, inequality and international development, how do we build this into the mainstream development discourse?”


“Reflections on the AWID Forum”
assembled by Oxfam International participants at the Forum

Caribbean Women activists who attended the Forum, pursued regional collaboration among Caribbean feminists from women’s, feminist, youth and LGBT organizations, and different religious backgrounds and ethnicities by organizing the “Catch a Fyah” meeting facilitated by CODE RED For Gender Justice, to build on regional connections and learnings from the Forum. (May 2012)

UN Women’s CSO section affirmed the commitment to feminist perspectives on women’s economic empowerment in its report, Considerations and Actions: Strategic issues for UN Women to reflect on from the AWID International Forum.

From Considerations and Actions: Strategic Issues for UN Women to reflect on from the AWID International Forum: “The feminist movement is arguing that …what is needed is a transformation of macroeconomics and the structural frameworks of finance…demanding a re-examination of the current models of growth and development that are fuelling inequality.

New knowledge must be developed that will provide the evidence and support to get from the current patterns of growth to a more humane and humanizing approach…UN Women should be in the frontline of this intellectual space and should support the development of feminist economic perspectives as part of its focus on economic empowerment of women.”

Nadine Moawad, a young Lebanese feminist, activist, blogger and member of Nasawiya Feminist Collective, was inspired to act with the knowledge she acquired at the Forum on economy and gender.

After attending the AWID 2012 Forum’s Economic Toolbox Session, “Demystifying Macroeconomic Policy”, and a spontaneous follow-up session that took place with feminist economist Radhika Balakrishnan, Nadine engaged with government officials in Lebanon that resulted in inclusion for the first time of a commitment to gender equality in the official socio-economic reform plan.



On the video below Radhika Balakrishnan speaks about the merits of applying the human rights framework to macroeconomic policy. Part of a series of short interviews produced by AWID in the lead up to the 12th AWID International Forum.


“[After the Forum] as I was going through the government website, I found their new socio-economic reform plan and a call for comments from the public. I read through it (thanks to Radhika's presentation, I could understand most of the terms and their gender implications) and I decided to email them some comments [as] the plan had zero mention of or attention to gender.

A week later, I get a reply from a woman on the socio-economic advisory team who invites me over to talk about my feedback and we start strategizing together how to include gender equality, budgeting, and mainstreaming in the government plan. Fast forward many meetings and a few weeks later, today, [Salim] gives me a call to tell me that we have officially succeeded in adding a commitment on gender equality (and the subsequent action plans that come with it) to the official plan for the first time ever!”

Nadine Moawad, Nasawiya Feminist Collective, Lebanon