ENG | ESP | FRA

Forum Overview



Forum
theme
Forum
theme
MENA
pre-Forum
meeting
MENA
pre-Forum
meeting
 
The 12th AWID International Forum on Women's Rights and Development boldly tackled a difficult theme within a complex global context. The theme of Transforming Economic Power to Advance Women’s Rights and Justice addressed the critically urgent need for stronger feminist engagement with issues of economic power, and exploration of possible responses and alternatives from a women’s rights perspective to respond to the global systemic crisis.

To learn more visit the online resource and learning hub on the AWID 2012 Forum theme.

Yvonne Underhill talks about political ecology. Part of a series of short interviews produced by AWID in the lead up to the 12th AWID International Forum.
Click here to watch the full video series.

Women organizers left [the Istanbul conference] with tools to understand the economic environment they struggle in. We left with a greater understanding of the links between us–from region to region, from sector to sector, from woman to woman. And everyone left with a renewed commitment to figure it out, step by step, empowering women in their daily lives toward solutions that respect women’s rights and build new paths toward strong and just communities, a healthy planet, and a happy future for our children.” —Laura Carlsen, Mexico
In collaboration with Women’s Learning Partnership, Global Fund for Women and the MENA Equality Without Reservation Coalition, we organized the one and a half-day pre-Forum meeting “Women’s Rights in Transitions to Democracy: Achieving Rights, Resisting Backlash”, attended by 95 participants including 58 women from the Middle East and North Africa and 37 from countries outside of the region.

This pre-Forum meeting was a significant space for women from the Middle East and North Africa region to share reflections and analysis on the impact on women’s rights of the political and social changes taking place in the region as part of the “Arab Spring” movements and to learn from women in other regions about priorities and experiences from past processes of transitions to democracy.

Through listening to participants and feminists from different countries, cultures and contexts, I was exposed to unconventional ideas and values that helped me develop a less conventional point of view and vision for my work.” —Sanaa Kareem Altaef, Iraq

I think that exposing the restrictions on rights and liberties that women are facing within a context that was expected to bring about democratic changes was spot on. This allowed us (myself and some of my colleagues) to see how even between contexts that are very different and far from each other this kind of dynamics are fundamentally similar...” —Morena Herrera, La Colectiva Feminista, El Salvador