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Specialized areas


The Forum program also included an expanded array of specialized areas to explore the theme through different formats in dynamic and flexible spaces. These areas were developed and planned in close collaboration with key allies from women’s rights movements.

Economic Education
Economic Education
Feminist ICT Hub
Feminist ICT Hub
Resource Mobilization Hub
Resource Mobilization Hub
Wellness and
Self-Care
Wellness and
Self-Care
Sex Worker area & Francophone Village
Sex Worker area & Francophone Village
 
The Economic Education Area included a room for breakout sessions as well as open spaces for Forum participants to come together, share experiences, tools, and methodologies and engage in strategic conversations about the role of economic education in the transformation of economic power. This space was one of considerable learning for participants both in terms of content of economics, and process for economic education.

To learn more about the Economic Education Area, visit the online resource and learning hub on the AWID 2012 Forum theme.

I would like to thank you for your great initiative and organizing the economic education space at the AWID Forum. KARAT appreciated a lot the opportunity to participate in the sessions, learn from others’ knowledge, approaches, cases and share its regional experience with the economic literacy program.
—Kinga Lohmann, Poland






The Feminist Information, Communications, and Technology (ICT) Hub was a space for communicators to gather and produce content on the Forum and share resources and ideas to build the capacity of women’s right’s advocates to use ICTs to transform economic power.

To learn more about the the Feminist Information, Communications, and Technology (ICT) Hub visit the online resource and learning hub on the AWID 2012 Forum theme.


Without a doubt information and communication technologies (ICTs) are changing the way we carry out our activism – in our neighborhoods or globally—and women’s rights activists are in the thick of it. After the AWID Forum, a fair amount of the coverage and content produced is related to ICTs.
—- Erika Smith, Association for Progressive Communications Women's Rights Programme (WRP)



Our Resource Mobilization Hub was developed in close collaboration with peers in the funding community and women’s rights movement. The Hub offered a dynamic space for discussions, dialogue, sharing, and learning related to mobilizing resources, funding trends, and fundraising for women’s rights and gender equality for both donors and women’s rights advocates.

To learn more about the Resource Mobilization Hub, visit the Resource Mobilization Hub page on our website.


"I learned a great deal at the Resource Mobilization Hub, where I spent considerable time, confirming some precepts about the state of the international funding world and being inspired to look for new ways of approaching resource mobilization to support the work of women."
Eleanor Douglas, Former ED
Urgent Action Fund (Latin America)


The Wellness and Self-Care Area was both a space where participants could recuperate, reinvigorate and calm their minds during the Forum, and a space to engage in conversations about different tools and approaches for self-care, safety and security.

To learn more about the Wellness and Self-Care Area, visit the online resource and learning hub on the AWID 2012 Forum theme.

I’ve gone to a lot of workshops and trainings for work on women’s rights. The integrated security training at the Forum was the first time that I went to a training for me.
—Wellness and Self-Care area participant

[To] take time to take care of myself is very revolutionary.
—Wellness and Self-Care area participant


The Sex Worker area was a vibrant space featuring artwork and other materials produced by the Asia-Pacific Network of Sex Workers, which also served as a meeting point for sex workers from different regions present at the Forum and a space to give visibility to this important constituency.

The Francophone Village was welcomed by francophone participants as a gathering place to meet, network, exchange and debate on topics linked to specific contexts and issues. This space was appreciated as one of learning and networking, connecting and celebration of francophone women’s rights activism.


To learn more about the Sex Worker Area, visit the online resource and learning hub on the AWID 2012 Forum theme.

Normally our voices are absent from debates about us, so it is exciting to think that sex workers' participation in the AWID Forum might help to change this restrictive trend in the current feminist movement and that the voices of sex workers can be heard and acknowledged.
— Kaythi Win, sex worker leader, Asia Pacific Network of Sex Worker Projects (APNSWP), Myanmar